Hidden Superpowers: How Dyslexia in the Workplace Can Be a Blessing

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Photo Credits - Rob Hobson via Unsplash

Dyslexia in the workplace can often be overlooked or improperly accommodated. This stems from the general lack of dyslexia awareness, even though around 10% of the population is dyslexic according to the British Dyslexia Association

Although it has no cure and is often viewed as a disadvantage, having dyslexia should not be viewed as so considering that many individuals with dyslexia have shown to be extremely successful. 

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Dyslexia in the Workplace

Dyslexia is a learning disability that affects reading and writing. It is a spectrum condition, meaning that people with dyslexia can experience various difficulties. Some people with dyslexia may struggle to read and write fluently, while others may have difficulty with spelling and grammar. Dyslexia can also affect other areas of learning, such as math and science.

Dyslexia is a common learning disability, affecting about 10% of the population. It is important to note that dyslexia is not a sign of intelligence. People with dyslexia can be just as intelligent as people without dyslexia. However, they may need additional support to succeed in school and the workplace.

Dyslexia at Work Affects Employees

Dyslexia can impact work in several ways. People with dyslexia may struggle to read and write emails, reports, and other work documents. They may also have difficulty following instructions, especially if they are written. People with dyslexia may also have difficulty organising their work and managing their time.

However, it is important to remember that dyslexia can also be a blessing. People with dyslexia often have unique strengths and abilities that can be valuable in the workplace. For example, people with dyslexia are often very creative and think outside the box. They may also be very good at solving problems and seeing the big picture.

Dyslexia Discrimination

Unfortunately, people with dyslexia often face discrimination in the workplace. This may be because employers are not aware of dyslexia or because they have misconceptions about what dyslexia is. Employers may also be reluctant to hire people with dyslexia because they worry that they may not be able to do the job.

It is important to note that employers are required to provide reasonable accommodations to employees with dyslexia. This means that employers must make changes to the workplace or the job duties of an employee with dyslexia so that they can perform their job.

How Dyslexia in the Workplace Can Be a Blessing for Employees

Having dyslexia in the workplace often has unique strengths and abilities that can be valuable. They are often creative and think outside the box, making them excellent problem-solvers and big-picture thinkers. They are also often excellent verbal and non-verbal communicators. In addition, people with dyslexia tend to be very resilient and resourceful.

Here are some specific examples of how people with dyslexia can contribute to the workplace:

  • A dyslexic employee might be able to come up with a new marketing campaign that is more effective than anything the company has used before.
  • A dyslexic employee might be able to identify a bug in a new software program and develop a fix for it.
  • A dyslexic employee might be able to identify a new market opportunity that the company has not considered before.
  • A dyslexic employee might be able to give a presentation to a group of potential clients and explain the company’s products or services in a way that is easy to understand.
  • A dyslexic employee might be able to tell that a customer is upset and take steps to resolve the situation.

If you are an employer, you should be open to hiring people with dyslexia. They have a lot to offer, and they can be valuable assets to your company.

Why Employers Should Hire People with Dyslexia

Employers should hire people with dyslexia for some reasons. 

First, people with dyslexia often have unique strengths and abilities that can be valuable in the workplace. Second, people with dyslexia are just as intelligent as people without dyslexia. Third, employers are required to provide reasonable accommodations to employees with dyslexia, so there is no reason not to hire them.

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Here are some specific examples of how people with dyslexia can contribute to the workplace:

  • Creativity: People with dyslexia can bring new ideas and perspectives to the workplace. They can help companies to innovate and develop new products and services.
  • Problem-solving: People with dyslexia can help companies to solve complex problems. They can identify and develop solutions that others might miss.
  • Big-picture thinking: People with dyslexia can help companies see the big picture and identify trends and opportunities. They can help companies to make better strategic decisions.
  • Communication: People with dyslexia can be excellent communicators. They can help companies to communicate their ideas effectively to customers, employees, and other stakeholders.

Dyslexia is a learning disability that affects reading and writing. However, it is important to remember that dyslexia can also be a blessing. People with dyslexia often have unique strengths and abilities that can be valuable in the workplace. Employers should be open to hiring people with dyslexia and providing them with the support they need to succeed.

On World Mental Health Day (10 October), it is important to remember that people with dyslexia, including those who have dyslexia in the workplace, are at an increased risk of mental health problems

If you require advice or guidance on workplace discrimination, head to the Redmans website. To get in touch with our team of expert employment lawyers, click here

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